— 10×10 Photobooks

Archive
10×10 American specialist

Day #9. Standard Bookstore in Osaka

Our selection of American photobooks is exclusively composed of books that are sold at the Standard Bookstore. The ten photobooks listed here are broadly divided into four types. The first grouping includes photobooks that are popular in our shop. The second are books that address what we perceive as “ cool American suburban culture.” But we need to preface that by saying that we’ve never been to the U.S., so this perception might be more reflective of stereotypes. The third type contains what we feel is a real depiction of everyday American life. And the fourth grouping showcases American women photographers, who explore the following characteristics as they relate to women: beauty, wildness, cruelty and adolescence.

Visit Standard Bookstore’s webpage to see the selection for 10×10 American Photobooks.

Standard Bookstore is located in the Shinsaibashi district of Osaka and known as “a bookstore without bestsellers.” The multilevel shop carries a wide selection of carefully curated photobooks, as well other books and objects of interest. There is also a café where visitors can browse books while enjoying light snacks.

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10×10 American Photobooks in Tokyo
Opening: Wednesday, 11 September 2013, 7 to 9

Tokyo Institute of Photography
Exart Bld. 1F, 3-6-6 Kyobashi
Chuo-ku, Tokyo

11 September – 6 October 2013 

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Day #8. Takayuki Kobayashi / flotsam books

Teenage runaway, skateboarder, outlaw, delinquent and street kid. I have selected ten photobooks that examine stories of youth lived at the fringes of society. Through the lens of American photographers who capture moments of transience, destruction, elation and daily joy, these books provide a glimpse of teenagers living day to day under the shadow of death. Appealing or not, they are painstakingly real.

Visit flotsam books’ webpage to see the selection for 10×10 American Photobooks.

Takayuki Kobayashi is the owner of flotsam books, a Japanese indie online photobook shop that carries a wide range of domestic and international photobooks, art portfolios and exhibition catalogs.

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10×10 American Photobooks in Tokyo
Opening: Wednesday, 11 September 2013, 7 to 9

Tokyo Institute of Photography
Exart Bld. 1F, 3-6-6 Kyobashi
Chuo-ku, Tokyo

11 September – 6 October 2013 

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Day #7. Mika Kobayashi / The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo

My selection focuses on American photobooks by photographers working on social issues related to politics, culture, economy, gender and family in the United States. Traditionally, images by socially concerned photographers tend to be straightforward in approach and closely related to photojournalism and documentary photography. This selection, however, seeks to highlight the variety and uniqueness of styles and approaches found in socially concerned photography. I chose photographers whose works are based on their personal experiences and strong viewpoints, which are then used to elaborate upon a conceptual framework and working method for shooting and editing books.

Visit Mika Kobayashi’s webpage to see the selection for 10×10 American Photobooks.

Mika Kobayashi is a photo critic and curator who writes for magazines and websites, and has taught at schools and institutions in both Japan and overseas. From 2007 to 2008, she resided in the United States as a grantee of the Asian Cultural Council and Patterson Fellowship, and worked at the International Center of Photography in New York and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. She is currently a guest researcher at the Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo and is an editorial member of the Trans Asia Photography Review.

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10×10 American Photobooks in Tokyo
Opening: Wednesday, 11 September 2013, 7 to 9

Tokyo Institute of Photography
Exart Bld. 1F, 3-6-6 Kyobashi
Chuo-ku, Tokyo

11 September – 6 October 2013 

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Day #1. Yoshikatsu Fujii / Photobook Club Tokyo 

I used the following criteria to make my selection: photos of America in which Japanese participants were involved in the production; photobooks that were discussed during the Photobook Club Tokyo meetups, which I supervise; and photobooks by extremely talented young photographers or independent publishers. Based on these standards, I saw the opportunity to inform others more specifically about a group of photographers who are generally known by the collective term, “foreign photographers.” I’ve only been to America once and don’t speak English fluently, but between the pages of these photobooks, one can find extremely powerful voices that I hope will continue to resonate ten or twenty years from now.

Visit Yoshikatsu Fujii‘s blog to see his selection for 10×10 American Photobooks.

After studying art film at Tokyo Zokei University of Arts, Yoshikatsu Fujii studied the fundamentals of photography under Masato Seto at the Evening Photography School work-shop. Besides his activities as a photographer, Fujii serves as Organizer of the Photobook Club Tokyo, which meets not only in Tokyo, but all over Japan.

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10×10 American Photobooks in Tokyo
Opening: Wednesday, 11 September 2013, 7 to 9

Tokyo Institute of Photography
Exart Bld. 1F, 3-6-6 Kyobashi
Chuo-ku, Tokyo
11 September – 6 October 2013

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A thoughtful and well researched article on 10×10 American Photobooks appears in American Photo. Check it out!

100 American Photobooks, Available for Instant Browsing—Offline, That Is. (May 8, 2013).

American Photo

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As part of 10×10 American Photobooks’ NYC Sneak Preview at the Ten10 Studios, May 3-5, 2013, we have been featuring on our website selections made by our reading room and online English language specialists. Each specialist has been asked to suggest 10 American photobooks from the past 25 years for a total of 100 photobooks in the reading room and an additional 100 books online: 10×10 (x2). Join the discussion on 10×10 American photobooks here.

10×10 Online Day #10.
James Pomerantz / The New Yorker

My selection of books is made up of those that have had an impact on me as a photographer and that I still return to for inspiration even with The New Yorker magazine’s ever-growing library of photobooks at my disposal.

James Pomerantz’s selection for the 10×10 Online:

  • Roger Ballen. Outland. (London: Phaidon Press, 2001).
  • Robert Bergman. A Kind of Rapture. (New York: Pantheon, 2008).
  • Jason Eskenazi. Wonderland: A Fairytale of the Soviet Monolith. (Millbrook, NY: de.MO, 2008).
  • Katy Grannan. Boulevard. (San Francisco: Fraenkel Gallery and New York: Salon 94, 2011).
  • Chauncey Hare. Protest Photos. (Göttengen: Steidl, 2009).
  • Tim Hetherington. Infidel. (London: Chris Boot Ltd., 2010).
  • Leigh Ledare. Pretend You’re Actually Alive. (New York: PPP Editions and Andrew Roth, 2008).
  • Ryan McGinley. The Kids are Alright. (New York: self-published, 2000).
  • Stephen Shore. A Road Trip Journal. (London: Phaidon Press, 2008).
  • Alec Soth. Broken Manual. (Göttengen: Steidl, 2012).

James Pomerantz is a New York-based photographer. He holds an MFA from the School of Visual Arts and is represented by Institute for Artist Management. James spends his days perched twenty floors above Times Square as the Photo Researcher at The New Yorker magazine. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, daughter and two cats.

10×10 Reading Room Day #10.
Leigh Ledare / Photographer

About Leigh Ledare’s selection for the 10×10 Reading Room:

As an artist I find myself most often captivated by what might be deemed “minor” works—works that subvert the expectations of a pre-existing genre from within. As repositories of critical reflection, these works articulate meaning by way of the artist’s process, attitude, or position as an historical subject. Often challenging, these works must be considered in relation to existent modes of working and the broader culture in which they’re set. While photography unquestionably indexes the literal world, it must also be regarded as an apparatus that—like language itself—structures ways in which we as individuals engage with and experience our worlds. With this in mind, I’ve selected a number of artist’s books that I feel reflect on this relationship to image production, photography, and the book in particular. To speak to just a few:

The three chapbooks consisting of a small fragment of John Miller’s seemingly ceaseless project Middle of the Day: despite what might be pictured in front of the lens, these images evade disclosing their true subject—the leisure time between 12pm and 2pm—inside of which, paradoxically, these photographs are produced.

The perverse wit literalized in Nicolas Guagnini’s Testicular Imprints: the artist’s studied selection of cultural ephemera, stamped over with an index that aligns the photographic act of framing with an act of appropriation and territorial marking.

Out to Lunch by Ari Marcopolous: composed of many moments of the artist’s production this book seems to trace the dissolution of the author, only to re-inscribe a collective authorship over the temporal landscape of the city and, in turn, the city over its inhabitants. It is a project which—including removable posters, sticker images, as well as an unfinished film script—itself is meant to be disassembled, re-contextualized, elaborated on, and extended beyond the simple bounds of the book.

Paul McCarthy’s Slowlife/Lowlife: an archive composing a subjective cultural history that doubles as an expansive index of the dialogs running throughout many decades of McCarthy’s own production.

In this sense the medium of photography can also be seen as a non-medium, something that becomes undeniably apparent within the realm of publication.

Highlights from Leigh Ledare’s Reading Room Selection:

John Miller. The Middle of the Day (Set of 3 Books). (Geneva: Cabinet des estampes and Karlsruhe: Kunstbüro, Museum für Literatur am Oberrhein, 1996; Geneva: Cabinet des estampes, 2000; Cologne: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2005). Each book: 16 x 15 cm. (44 pp).

John Miller. The Middle of the Day (Set of 3 Books)

Aura Rosenberg. Head Shot. (New York: Stop Over Press, 1996). 25 x 18 cm. (96 pp).

Aura Rosenberg. Head Shot. (New York: Stop Over Press, 1996).

Paul McCarthy. Low Life, Slow Life. (San Francisco: CCA Wattis Institute and Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2010). 24 x 17 cm. (647 pp).

Paul McCarthy. Low Life, Slow Life. (San Francisco: CCA Wattis Institute and Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2010).

Leigh Ledare uses photography, archival material, and text to explore human agency, social relationships, taboos and the photographic in equal turns. His distinct but related bodies of work are studies not only of their visible subjects, but also of photography itself: how it mediates identity, relationships, love, loss, and, perhaps above all, human vulnerability. Ledare has shown widely within the United States and Europe, recently having had major surveys of his work at WIELS Center for Contemporary Culture, Brussels, as well as Charlottenborg Kunsthal, Copenhagen. Ledare graduated with an MFA from Columbia University and has taught at Columbia University, California Institute of the Arts, and New York University.

To see these books in person and the other 7 books selected by Leigh Ledare, please visit the 10×10 American Photobooks Reading Room

4-5 May, from 12 to 8 
Opening: Friday, 3 May, from 7 to 9

Ten10 Studios
10-10 47th Road
Long Island City, NY 11101

Click here for a complete list of all 10×10 Specialists

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As part of 10×10 American Photobooks’ NYC Sneak Preview at the Ten10 Studios, May 3-5, 2013, we have been featuring on our website selections made by our reading room and online English language specialists. Each specialist has been asked to suggest 10 American photobooks from the past 25 years for a total of 100 photobooks in the reading room and an additional 100 books online: 10×10 (x2). Join the discussion on 10×10 American photobooks here.

10×10 Online Day #9.
Jörg Colberg / Conscientious

Joerg Colberg’s selection for the 10×10 Online:

  • Michael Abrams. Welcome to Springfield. (Rockville, MD: Loosestrife Editions, 2012).
  • Chris Anderson. Capitolio.(Mexico: Editorial RM, 2009).
  • Richard Avedon and James Baldwin. Nothing Personal (Barcelona: Penguin Books, 1964).
  • Adam Bartos. Yard Sale. (Bologna: Damiani, 2009).
  • Raymond Meeks. Amwell, Continuum. (Portland, OR: Dumbsaint Editions, 2010).
  • Raymond Meeks and Mark Steinmetz. Orchard Vol. 3, Idyll. (New York: Silas Finch, 2011).
  • Jonathan Saunders. Dies Lunae XI Julius MMXI. (Self-published, 2011).
  • Charlie Simokaitis. Despite or Because of. (Self-published, 2011).
  • Jerry Spagnoli. American Dreaming. (Göttingen: Steidl, 2012).
  • Mark Steinmetz. South East. (Portland, OR: Nazraeli Press, 2008).

Jörg Colberg is the founding editor of the photography website Conscientious. Colberg writes regularly on photography for international magazines and authored introductions for artist monographs. He is a professor of photography in the MFA Photography Program at the Hartford Art School.

10×10 Reading Room Day #9.
Alec Soth and Brad Zellar/ Little Brown Mushroom

About selection for the 10×10 Reading Room:

Obviously both Alec and I really love photobooks, and we’re both pretty avid collectors. There have been so many incredible books made over the time period we had to choose from, but unfortunately a lot of those are difficult to find and even more expensive to acquire. And since we’re both committed to the…I don’t know, I guess I’ll say democratic possibilities of the form, we spent a lot of time looking for great work that was also still accessible, affordable, and –at least in our opinions– overlooked. It was an interesting challenge, and fun to revisit so many old favorites.

Highlights from Alec Soth and Brad Zellar’s Reading Room Selection:

John Divola, Edward Dimendberg and Theresa Luisotti. Continuity. (Santa Monica: R.A.M. Publications, 1997). 26 x 30 cm. (72 pp).
John Divola, Edward Dimendberg and Theresa Luisotti. Continuity. (Santa Monica: R.A.M. Publications, 1997).

Birney Imes and Richard Ford. Juke Joint. (Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 1990).
27 x 29 cm. (108 pp).

Birney Imes and Richard Ford. Juke Joint. (Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 1990).

Chris Verene. Family. (Santa Fe: Twin Palms, 2010).
33 x 28 cm. (120 pp).

Chris Verene. Family. (Santa Fe: Twin Palms, 2010).

Alec Soth is a photographer born and based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. His first monograph, Sleeping by the Mississippi, was published by Steidl in 2004. Since then Soth has published over a dozen books including Dog Days, Bogotá (2007), The Last Days of W (2008), and Broken Manual (2010). In 2008, a large survey exhibition of Soth’s work was exhibited at Jeu de Paume in Paris and Fotomuseum Winterthur in Switzerland. In 2010, the Walker Art Center produced a large survey exhibition of Soth’s work entitled From Here To There. Soth is represented by Sean Kelly in New York, Weinstein Gallery in Minneapolis, and is a member of Magnum Photos.

Brad Zellar has worked as a writer and editor for daily and weekly newspapers, as well as for both regional and national magazines. He is the author of Suburban World: The Norling Photos, The 1968 Project, Conductors of the Moving World, and House of Coates. He has received awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, The American Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, and the Minnesota Magazine Publishers Association, as well as a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board. His fiction has appeared in numerous publications, and he has been a groundskeeper at a minor league baseball stadium, worked on a National Park Service trail crew in Maine, and co-owned a used bookstore in Minneapolis.

To see these books in person and the other 7 books selected by Alec Soth and Brad Zellar, please visit the 10×10 American Photobooks Reading Room

4-5 May, from 12 to 8 
Opening: Friday, 3 May, from 7 to 9

Ten10 Studios
10-10 47th Road
Long Island City, NY 11101

Click here for a complete list of all 10 x 10 Specialists

Read More

As part of 10×10 American Photobooks’ NYC Sneak Preview at the Ten10 Studios, May 3-5, 2013, we will be featuring for the next 2 days selections made by our reading room and online English language specialists. Each specialist has been asked to suggest 10 American photobooks from the past 25 years for a total of 100 photobooks in the reading room and an additional 100 books online: 10×10 (x2). Join the discussion on 10×10 American photobooks here.

10×10 Online Day #8.
Eric Miles / photo-eye, Director of rare books and online auctions 

About Eric Miles’ selection for the 10×10 Online:

The books on my list all reflect in their own ways a dramatic shift in photo culture that was already well underway by the mid-eighties. Approaches rooted in the traditions of documentary and “social landscape” photography were already giving way to an interest in vernacular imagery and the “banal,” influenced in no small part by the ubiquity of consumer culture. This paradigm shift inaugurated a new canon, with William Eggleston, Nan Goldin, Stephen Shore and Joel Sternfeld among the central influences on a new generation, supplanting those of Frank, Friedlander, Arbus and Winogrand. But more than just subject matter was changing; there was also the rise of the “snapshot” aesthetic, emphasizing not the subject per se, but a particular quality of observation. Over time, following Shore and Eggleston especially, but also the unsung Allan Ruppersberg, the Apotheosis of the Banal was complete. And while autobiographical pursuits were certainly not new among photographers, many would follow the 80s paradigm set by Nan Goldin, recording intense “domestic” dramas and pushing the bounds of painful intimacy and portrayal of emotional chaos. So, if I were to go way out on a limb and try to pull out a thread that tied these books together, I’d have to say that it is a radical engagement with the everyday, with nothing too prosaic to photograph – a desire to make the plain romantic and imbue the familiar stuff of our visual lives with a new sense of wonder.

Click here to visit photo-eye website and check the selection:

Eric Miles is a bookseller, writer and visual consultant living in Brooklyn, NY. In addition to overseeing photo-eye‘s rare book and print auctions since 2004, he has written on photography and photobooks for various publications and consults on publishing projects for photographers and digital agencies.

10×10 Reading Room Day #8.
Bruno Ceschel / Self Publish, Be Happy 

About Bruno Ceschel’s selection for the 10×10 Reading Room:

Don’t we all need to materialize a narrative of our lives? Don’t we all succumb to the narcissistic pleasure of making history? Such a story is endlessly amended, censored, updated, overwritten, rediscovered. At times, we are forced, urged or encouraged to freeze it. To package it for posterity.

Photography is certainly our time’s favorite tool to frame and fix a history. With its misleading objective allure and its undeniable accessibility, both in terms of making and reading, photography is a default means for such a process. Family albums, Flickr diaries and Facebook galleries are just some of the many incarnations of such relentless efforts. Every day we are asked to choose what photographs to post, veto, tag; to assemble our identity (i.e., how we like ourselves and others to see us) on many digital social platforms. Sometimes such a copy and paste endeavor is time well spent — an exercise in exploring and possibly understanding ourselves.

Artists too have used photography for such history-writing and identity-constructing exercises. And these investigations have even taken the somewhat unsurprising form of a book. What other support can offer such intimate consumption? Artists have done so with uncompromising honesty (think of Larry Clark or Nan Goldin), wit (Edward Ruscha) and juvenile candor (Ryan McGinley) throughout the history of photobook making in America. In the last decade, this tradition has exponentially increased, in the form of self-published books. Extensions of personal diaries, (sometimes) offering powerful insight into human lives/minds. The following selection of books, part of the Self Publish, Be Happy Collection, show some diverse artists mediations/experimentation of photographic diaries.

Highlights from Bruno Ceschel’s Reading Room Selection:

Tim Barber. Mystic Heather and Virgin Snow. (New York: self-published, 2008).
25 x 20 cm. (88 pp).

Tim Barber. Mystic Heather and Virgin Snow. (New York: self-published, 2008)

Nicholas Muellner. The Amnesia Pavilions. (Ithaca, NY: A-Jump Books, 2011).
Edition of 500. 19 x 20 cm. (200 pp).

Nicholas Muellner. The Amnesia Pavilions. (Ithaca, NY: A-Jump Books, 2011).

RJ Shaughnessy. Deathcamp. (Los Angeles: self-published, 2007).
Edition of 300. 23 x 18 cm. (152 pp).

RJ Shaughnessy. Deathcamp. (Los Angeles: self-published, 2007).

Bruno Ceschel is a writer, curator and lecturer in photography at the University of the Arts, London. He is the founder of Self Publish, Be Happy (SPBH), an organization that collects, promotes and studies contemporary self-published photobooks. The SPBH collection contains more than 1,000 publications and with an extensive series of workshops, talks and projects the organization has become a platform for a worldwide community of contemporary photographers.   

SPBH has organized events at a number of institutions in London (The Photographer’s Gallery, ICA, Whitechapel Gallery) and abroad (C/O Berlin, Printed Matter in NYC, MiCamera in Milan), and most recently published books by artists Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, Cristina De Middel and collector Brad Feuerhelm for the series SPBH Book Club.

Click here for a complete list of all 10 x 10 Specialists

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As part of 10×10 American Photobooks’ NYC Sneak Preview at the Ten10 Studios, May 3-5, 2013, we will be featuring for the next 3 days selections made by our reading room and online English language specialists. Each specialist has been asked to suggest 10 American photobooks from the past 25 years for a total of 100 photobooks in the reading room and an additional 100 books online: 10×10 (x2). Join the discussion on 10×10 American photobooks here.

10×10 Online Day #7.
Heidi Sanders / 6 Decades Books

About Heidi Sanders’ selection for the 10×10 Online:

My selection is representative of the sort of artists’ books that we focus on at 6 Decades Books. In each of these titles, the artist has used photographic imagery in the process of making a book which is itself an artwork, not a book where the main point is to reproduce a series of individual images. These are all compelling photobooks, but in several cases the artists who made them are not generally thought of as photographers, or the photographic content consists primarily of pre-existing, or anonymous images. Mike Kelley and Paul Schiek, whose titles are the chronological bookends of the list, both created their works by editing and curating images, rather than making new ones. It is not great photography that interests me so much as the way an artist engages with the book as a medium, using the form to shape content and convey an artistic vision so that the book as a whole communicates in a way that no single image could.

Click here to visit Heidi Sanders’ website and check the selection:

Heidi Sanders runs 6 Decades Books, a business specializing in artists’ books and related artwork and ephemera from the 1960s to the present, with her husband, Jeremy Sanders. Previously, she was director of John McWhinnie @ Glenn Horowitz Bookseller. She received a Master of Arts in the History of Decorative Arts and Design at Bard Graduate Center.

10×10 Reading Room Day #7.
David Senior / The Museum of Modern Art Library

About David Senior’s selection for the 10×10 Reading Room:

Most of the time, I am generally overwhelmed by the volume of materials that comes through the library where I work. In the process, I manage to see a lot of things. This suits my taste – I like the idea of accumulation and the strange and funny connections that can arise from chance groupings of books. They can tell a story or create a weird sentence. I also think that this is how thought works: – resembling a pile of books – where words and images mingle and bounce off of each other so as to create little messages and subtle truths.

Highlights from David Senior’s Reading Room Selection:

Anne Collier. Woman with A Camera (35mm). (New York: Hassla Books, 2009).
23 cm. (44 pp).

Anne Collier. Woman with A Camera (35mm). (New York: Hassla Books, 2009).

David Horvitz. Sad, Depressed, People. (Vancouver: New Documents, 2012).
25 x 18 cm. (64 pp).

David Horvitz. Sad, Depressed, People. (Vancouver: New Documents, 2012).

David Wojnarowicz. Rimbaud in New York 1978-79. (New York: PPP Editions and Roth Horowitz, 2004).
Edition of 1000. 29 x 22 cm. (108 pp).

David Wojnarowicz. Rimbaud in New York 1978-79. (New York: PPP Editions and Roth Horowitz, 2004).

David Senior is the Bibliographer at The Museum of Modern Art Library. He manages collection development of the general holdings of the Library as well as the selection of materials for the artists’ books collection. With Printed Matter, he organizes an annual program of events for the New York Art Book Fair.

To see these books in person and the other 7 books selected by David Senior, please visit the 10×10 American Photobooks Reading Room

4-5 May, from 12 to 8 
Opening: Friday, 3 May, from 7 to 9

Ten10 Studios
10-10 47th Road
Long Island City, NY 11101

Click here for a complete list of all 10 x 10 Specialists

Read More

As part of 10×10 American Photobooks’ NYC Sneak Preview at the Ten10 Studios, May 3-5, 2013, we will be featuring for the next 4 days selections made by our reading room and online English language specialists. Each specialist has been asked to suggest 10 American photobooks from the past 25 years for a total of 100 photobooks in the reading room and an additional 100 books online: 10×10 (x2). Join the discussion on 10×10 American photobooks here.

10×10 Online Day #6.
Philip Tomaru / Arts & Sciences Projects

About Philip Tomaru’s selection for the 10×10 Online:

My initial excitement upon being invited was followed by moments of trepidation, as the task of reducing my selection to 10 books suddenly felt like a daunting one. From the outset, I decided to self-impose some parameters to help guide my selection process. First, I decided to focus only on books that I own. I also expanded my definition of photobooks to include photozines and other artists’ publications that use photographic content as source material. Finally, I attempted to eschew books by the “usual suspects.” After a few rounds of tweaking to avoid redundancy with the other lists, my selection represents a diverse spectrum of photobooks and photozines culled from my personal collection. Indeed, this selection reflects my own personal tastes and interests, which lean more heavily towards self-published books and independent publishers. Over the past several years, we’ve seen explosive growth in independent publishing as artists have sought direct engagement with both analog and digital technologies in the production and circulation of their work. My selection acknowledges these dynamic and vibrant efforts.  These are books I enjoy in the comfort of my home while sipping a cup of coffee. These are books I discovered through direct contact with artists, at specialty bookstores, and at venues such as the NY Art Book Fair. Essentially, these books caught my eye, bring pleasure to my daily rituals, and embody aesthetic, conceptual, and technical qualities that I value.

Click here to visit Philip Tomaru’s website and check the selection:

Philip Tomaru is an independent publisher of photobooks and zines. With Martin Masetto, he is co-director of Arts & Sciences Projects, a platform for artists and other collaborators to produce and disseminate work via independent publishing, an alternative exhibition space, and temporary installations and performances. Tomaru works closely with artists in the conceptual, editorial, and production phases of book publishing, and has exhibited at the NY Art Book Fair, LA Art Book Fair, and other venues.

10×10 Reading Room Day #6.
Christina Labey / Conveyor Arts

About Christina Labey’s selection for the 10×10 Reading Room:

In making selections, my criteria included books that spoke to the American landscape as their subject, that demonstrated a sensibility towards materials, and that incorporated a code, an understated subtext, into the structure of the book. I am partial to self-published and small publishing endeavors, which I believe is an important characteristic of the photobook movement at present.

I think it’s inherent in the American psyche to be drawn to the landscape—to the myth, the sublime, the familiar, and the phenomenal. It’s a subject that has been tirelessly explored in photographic books since their inception, and a history in which I am particularly interested. I chose publications that cultivate a new kind of narrative, a re-imagination of the landscape, in a broad sense. I was attracted to books whose treatment of design delicately balance lyric and logic in the structure, that create an experience for the viewer and beckon a return to its pages again and again, allowing new relationships and insights to surface. Finally, tactile quality and the book as object is incredibly important, as is a smart sense of materials that build a form to fit the content.

Highlights from Christina Labey’s Reading Room Selection:

Moyra Davey. Long Life Cool White. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Art Museums, 2008).
24 x 22 cm. (152 pp).

Moyra Davey. Long Life Cool White. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Art Museums, 2008).

Jason Fulford. Raising Frogs for $$$. (Los Angeles: The Ice Plant, 2006).
29 x 23 cm. (96 pp).

Jason Fulford. Raising Frogs for $$$. (Los Angeles: The Ice Plant, 2006).

Athena Torri, Bea Fremderman, Ingo Mittelstaedt, and Stuart Bailes. Hired Hand. (Copenhagen: Vandret Publications, 2012).
Edition of 350. 26 x 20 cm. (64 pp).

Athena Torri, Bea Fremderman, Ingo Mittelstaedt, and Stuart Bailes. Hired Hand. (Copenhagen: Vandret Publications, 2012).

Christina Labey is an artist and publisher. She studied photography and art history at the University of Minnesota, Duluth and completed her MFA at Parsons The New School for Design. She founded Conveyor Arts with partner Jason Burstein, through which they run a publishing label, as well as custom book making services for other artists.  She is also editor-in-chief of the annual Conveyor Magazine.

To see these books in person and the other 7 books selected by Christina Labey, please visit the 10×10 American Photobooks Reading Room

4-5 May, from 12 to 8 
Opening: Friday, 3 May, from 7 to 9

Ten10 Studios
10-10 47th Road
Long Island City, NY 11101

Click here for a complete list of all 10 x 10 Specialists

Read More